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The New To Graffiti Thread

Discussion in 'Toys forum' started by koper, Jan 12, 2007.

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  1. koper

    koper Banned

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    DO NOT POST ANYTHING OTHER THAN TUTORIALS IN THIS THREAD, DISOBEYING THIS RULE COULD EARN YOU A SUSPENSION
    And please dont go cry in your bed if your tutorial is deleted, there has to be quality control in this thread.

    This thread is for tutorials or articles dedicated to teaching people about graffiti.

    Thanx to "What Happened to the Letters" for this article:

    ok so here is a page taken out of the art of getting over, it was originally a transscript at the Graffiti Writers Local One Union Hall.



    SO YOU WANT TO WRITE ON WALLS?
    There are few things you must do to make your presence in this subculture a welcome one. First; Know the history. Second; Know the rules of the game. Third; work hard at being good, or at least competent. Fourth; snitches and shit tlakers get stitches and need walkers. Fifth; you're good, but not that good. Keep your fat head to a reasonable swell and get back to work. These are the five fingers to your left hand, get to know them well. Soon you'll be able to get a grip on your self-esteem and we'll all be better for it.


    FIRST : INDUSTRY
    Cavemen drew pictures on walls, but egyptians were the first language artists, then Romans bit the steez. The Greeks, Incans, and Native Americans all got with the program. There was graffiti on the New York subway a year after it was built. There is graffiti on the moon. If graffiti is vandalism, and vandalism is a form of pollution, then man has left his mark with garbage at the fullest reaches of the universe. So you with your pathetic desire to be remembered are in good company. It's important to know how graff developed in your area code, so consul local experts, and remember, everybody lies.


    SECOND; THE RULES
    1)You suck until further notice
    2)It's gonna take a long time before we even acknowledge your existence, even longer before we can bear to look at that foul scribble you clal your name. To speed the process of acceptance, you can:
    A-Choose a clever name that defies the norm of simple-minded slang. An example of a good name is "ARGUE" (RIP). It looks good when written, sounds cool when spoken, and conveys a combatative attitude. On the other hand "ENEMA" (actual name) looks, sounds, and conveys a shitty attitude. BE CHOOSY.
    B-Use paint, gain a thorough knowledge of supplies, remember that permission walls, stickers, and dust tags are small parts of a balanced diet, be bold, learn a style of writing for every occasion, and write your name bigger every time you go out.
    3)Jealousy is a disease for the weak
    4)Your heart is your greatest possession, don't let it get taken from you.
    5) Don't writ on houses of worship, people's houses in general, other writers names, and tombstones. Writing on memorial wallas and cars is beef beyond belief. Furthermore, involving civilians in your beef is gorunds for dismissal. These are the five finges to your right hand. Get to know them well. Give them soul claps, firm handshakes, and throw smooth bolo punches


    THIRD; DEVELOPING STYLE
    Although being a toy seems undesirable, you should enjoy it while you can. at this stage you can bite all you want with no remorse. All your elders will say is, "Awww isn't that cute, kootchie kotchie koo." So steal that dope connection, rob that color scheme, and loot whole letterforms. Don't worry about giving any credit, we'll pat ourselves on the back and brag how we influenced the next generation. However, style isn't a cruch or schtick. It is understanding why that connection you bit flows, or why that color scheme bumps. Style is the process to an appealing end. Once you got it down to a science, you cna reinvent letterforms to suit yourself. This creative growth will amaze the old and young alike. Pretty soon somebody will steal your secret sauce and the cycle will be renewed. If this happens to you, don't bitch about not getting your due.

    Graffiti is the language of the ignored. If your style is stolen, someone heard you speaking. You got what you wanted from the beginning, some attention, you big baby.


    FOURTH: THE LAW
    It must be noted that hte vandal squad loves graffiti. Their job requires them to fiend for graff as much as you do. When you wreck enough walls, they'll want ot meet you. Just liek the ball huggers outside the graff shop, they'll recite every spot you hit, with the difference being you'll also hear the miranda warning. To postpone this, go solo as much as possible. Don't write with anyone that won't fight for you. Don't be paranoid, but be careful. If you avoid writing on pristine properties, you'll stay in misdameanor territory, and you woen't divert the cops attention from pastry and caffein consumption (consult local laws to be sure). Remember, if they didnt see you do it, it's almost impossible for them to win a conviction without your damming testimony. Shut up, shut up, SHUT UP! Giving a cop info on another writer wil doom you to a life of ridicule, from cops and kids alike, with no parole.


    FIFTH: EGO TRIPPIN
    There';s nothign wrong iwth knowing you're the shit as long as you are. But once you reach that conclusion, you're one foot ove the edge of falling off. Watch your step fathead, theres no shortage of people chanting, "JUMP JUMP JUMP!" There are plenty of writers that have been painting for well ovr 20 years, and your posing and fronting looks retarted next to them. Get back to work you "never was" slouch.
    In conclusion, graffiti is free,impresses the girls, is heroic in our coach potatoe culture, will provide you with a million stories to tell at parties, and a sure cure for the inner city blues. If it's not fun, you're doing it wrong or have been doing it too long. So get going, fame awaits the fly amongst you
    -Mark Surface
     
  2. d_g

    d_g Elite Member

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  3. minesweep

    minesweep Elite Member

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    via artcrimes

    Graffiti Introduction
    This file needs YOUR help! please continue to make it more complete and more enjoyable to read.. thanks!
    ([email protected])

    There is rarely a day that goes by when I fail to see someone sporting a Stussy T-shirt or cap. It seems like ever since "Smells Like Teen Spirit" grunge took over the world that the seventies, along with its plethora of fads, is back in style. This includes not only bell-bottoms, but also what is known as the aerosol culture. Unfortunately, it seems that the core of the whole art is still back in the seventies for many of today's writers, and superfluous repainting of objects by non-union workers is without the moral codes, feelings, and purposes it once had. This introduction to graffiti is intended to serve both as a guide for newcomers and a reference for experienced writers who sometimes lose sight as to what its all about.

    Tagging, the most primitive form of the graffiti art, consists of a writer's signature, usually done in permanent marker or spray paint. Artistically, tagging is the root of graffiti, and a skill a writer must become proficient at before becoming an accomplished graffiti artist.

    The first thing you need to do is choose a tag, or a name which you will be known by in the graffiti community. DO NOT TAKE THIS LIGHTLY; if you choose something stupid it will come back to haunt you. "Stupid" things include choosing initials, nicknames, names already in use, famous people, corny or trite words, and words that are just plain dumb. A tag is usually 3 to 7 characters but can be shorter or longer if really deemed necessary. Those with a tag greater than 4 letters will often find it necessary to develop a "shortened" version of the tag for time and space-sensitive places. In tagging, as _Subway Art_ [Chalfant] (a book regarded by writers as the "Graffiti Bible") points out, "[graffiti writers] confront the first need to have style."

    _Subway Art_ goes on to say that "Style is a very concrete idea among writers. It is form, the shapes of the letters, and how they connect. There are various categories of style, ranging from the old, simple bubble letters ... to highly evolved and complex wildstyle, an energetic interlocking construction of letters with arrows and other forms that signify movement and direction." Just as one can say "thanks," and mean it honestly, sarcastically, scornfully, or any of a thousand different ways, it is how the word is delivered that determines how it is understood. Graffiti without style, much like a monotonous voice, becomes ambiguous, and is either interpreted with hatred or indifference. Simply put, style speaks a thousand more words than a writer's tag ever will.

    Each tag without style can be thought of as a writer without true devotion and commitment for the art. It represents a writer who wants the fame, glory, and recognition without sacrificing the many hours necessary to obtain the skills required for style. Becoming adept in translating emotions into rapid and smooth lines is a never-ending process that in essence is the key to all graffiti.

    When I began writing, I thought the only thing needed to get famous was to go around writing my name, but it wasn't long before that illusion wore off. I still see trash cans and phone booths with old tags of mine on them, but I'm ashamed of them now. Ashamed of them because they demonstrated my ignorance to the feelings and passions that fuel the art. Ashamed of them because they had no style.

    Almost every time I hit up an area, I go back a week later to check it out. I return not to admire it, but to analyze and critique it. I take photos of everything (except plain tags), to help me find and work through the flaws of my art. This process appears to be often overlooked by writers at Newton South, but I think it is far more important than the work itself. As _Subway Art_ states, "Graffiti is a public performance," and everything one submits will be critiqued by every passer-by, so it's better if you can examine it and improve it before anyone else gets the chance.

    It is unfortunate that many beginning writers think the only admission to the graff community is going down to Staples and buying a permanent marker. Magnums, Mean Streaks, and SG-7's do not make one an accomplished writer, they merely make one a vandal. It is then up to that vandal to privately evolve his or her art to lettering with emotion and energy.

    Just as one would not try an instrument out for the first time at a public performance, the best way to start learning style is not going around bombing (saturating an area with one's tag) the walls of the city or the insides of trains. Learning graffiti is a lot like learning how to play an instrument: start learning in private with someone you admire. Try going down to derelict train lots with someone who has been writing for a few years, and hit the place up. Have the writer point out what he or she does or does not like about your style, and have the writer suggest ways to improve it. Above all, it is important you listen to what they have to say; they know what they're talking about and have been at it far longer than you. Remember, everyone in the graffiti community was a toy (inexperienced writer) once, and anyone who says they weren't lies through their teeth. The writing community, like most communities, is one that places elders (those with many years of experience) first. Novices look to people with a year or two of writing experience, those people with a couple of years of training look up to those from the previous generation, and so it continues.

    Style is a constantly evolving entity, and was around long before you, so don't be disappointed if you can't just go blasting out dazzling wildstyle lettering on your first try. If you're going to try paint, start with dead letters, simple block letters that aren't filled in (wasting paint for a one coat fill isn't worth it in an abandoned yard). Resist all urges to coerce style into your letters, it will not turn out the way you hoped. Rather, become proficient in doing the dead letters fast and accurately, and along the way you will see subtle nuances of your lettering technique that will eventually evolve into style. Remember that spray paint is not a substance that lends itself to lazy hands, so every move of the can should be quick and smooth or you will get drips and shaky lines. If you can, try to acquire some caps (nozzles) which either spray a really fat line (reducing the amount of paint that can drip) or release the paint at a slower rate.

    Once you've gotten your lettering down, moving on to more complex forms of the art should be a snap. Never be afraid to experiment with letters, but bear in mind there's only so much one can do with a letter before it either becomes obfuscated by debris or turns into another letter. Also, magazines such as _Can Control_, _Hype_ and _Skills_ contain tons of photos for the aspiring writer. It is important to keep in mind that while learning others' style is a great learning tool, stealing their letter style (biting), is perhaps one of the worst offenses a writer can be charged with.

    Remember, time isn't of the essence. The trains, buildings, and highways aren't going anywhere, so take the time necessary to evolve your style before going out and making a public display. Getting style isn't easy, and it takes many hours of arduous work to evolve into a presentable state. As the "Graffiti Bible" says, "There is no easy way to learn the complicated wildstyle, and no substitute for time. Rather, the best way to learn is through recapitulating the entire history of graffiti art, from the simple to the complex."

    So, if you're serious about your artwork, take the time to show your devotion to all the writers around you. Plan out your art in a bible (sketchbook) ahead of time, and make sure you have the skills necessary to execute such a "piece" (short for masterpiece) when put in a time-constrained, dangerous situation. Work through the flaws and faults of your style with someone you respect and admire in the graffiti community, and above all, don't be afraid to be criticized. So, for all you real writers out there who will be around to pass the torch on to the next generation, keep practicing, and don't get caught.

    [email protected]

    kairos-one!LIQUID!spinal!CHAOS * integrity is essential * drink ink
     
  4. koper

    koper Banned

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    Thanks to "What Happened to the Letters?" For digging these up from sky5. If anyone else has some stuff saved from before this thread was wiped please send it to me.

    sky5:
    ai47.photobucket.com_albums_f182_rogan181_page2.jpg
    ai47.photobucket.com_albums_f182_rogan181_page1.jpg
     
  5. bouncingsoul

    bouncingsoul Elite Member

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  6. koper

    koper Banned

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    Thanks to "Some Guy from NCI" for this one

    SUPER RESCUE POST... TO THE RESCUE!


    [Broken External Image]:http://img67.imageshack.us/img67/2759/tsep11jc.gif
    STEP 1: Do a basic letter.

    [Broken External Image]:http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/9554/tsep20tz.gif
    STEP 2: The vanishing point, Put this anywhere you want the 3d to go.

    [Broken External Image]:http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/1640/tsep32yf.gif
    STEP 3: Join up all the corners to the vanishing point.

    [Broken External Image]:http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/8425/tsep43bi.gif
    STEP 4: If you want to change the size of the 3d, just do parralel lines going across it (if you get what i mean) :unsure:

    [Broken External Image]:http://img67.imageshack.us/img67/4628/tsep59om.jpg
    STEP 5: Touch up any bits here and there and BadaBing BadaBoom...


    You have yourself a third dimension (with perspective ;) )
     
  7. koper

    koper Banned

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    Thanks to "Kaser TBS" for finding some links to some of the tutorials from the old thread.

    Here are some he found by Splitbomber and NICCSACC, Runci, Luster, Chroma 11820:

    SplitBomber:
    [Broken External Image]:http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/8212/tuteo4pn2.jpg


    NICCSACC:
    K...
    [Broken External Image]:http://img126.imageshack.us/img126/8870/picture351yz1.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img148.imageshack.us/img148/7994/picture36vw1.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/3322/picture37sy4.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/6429/picture38cm0.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/4669/picture39ql3.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/7260/picture40bd0.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img489.imageshack.us/img489/2235/picture41nf5.jpg


    E...
    [Broken External Image]:http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/6980/picture42qp3.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/8913/picture43ud4.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img145.imageshack.us/img145/3512/picture442hn3.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/8639/picture451td0.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/315/picture461an3.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/6673/picture471si8.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/4230/picture481yo0.jpg
    [Broken External Image]:http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/5212/picture492pm4.jpg
     
  8. koper

    koper Banned

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  9. koper

    koper Banned

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  10. imported_Bes_one

    imported_Bes_one Member

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  11. d_g

    d_g Elite Member

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  12. east_van_tagger

    east_van_tagger Member

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    ok iknow its technically a tutorial but it is a good thing to know so here it is

    color wheel click here!

    its the all important color wheel
     
  13. Slushi

    Slushi Banned

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  14. etch a sketch

    etch a sketch Senior Member

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    How to do a throw-up!!

    I found it on google by the way..

    1.Do your outline in the colour you plan to fill in.
    [Broken External Image]:http://img347.imageshack.us/img347/2687/throwup1pn3.jpg

    2. Fill in the letters with a smooth back-and-forth motion.
    [Broken External Image]:http://img263.imageshack.us/img263/7509/throwup2nd3.jpg

    3.Outline your letters in another colour.
    [Broken External Image]:http://img347.imageshack.us/img347/503/throwup3yf3.jpg

    4.Add some drop shadow
    [Broken External Image]:http://img347.imageshack.us/img347/3020/throwup4kn2.jpg

    5.Throw an additional outline around the whole thing in a third color to make it pop out...
    [Broken External Image]:http://img347.imageshack.us/img347/7388/throwup5az4.jpg

    The End
    :lol: :lol: :lol:
     
  15. MainEvent

    MainEvent Senior Member

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  16. MainEvent

    MainEvent Senior Member

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    from mr wiggles' site.

    How To Turn A Tag Into A Piece

    1- Take two pencils, and tape them together and make sure the points are even.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/d485e440.jpg

    2- Hit a light tag on a blank paper (do not put to much pressure on the pencil so that the tag is very light), and make sure that the letters are positioned even (use guide lines if you have to.) You can make it a simple tag, or you can make it a more stylized tag. In this example I chose a more simple tag.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/d495e8e0.jpg

    3- Now get a single and darker pencil (or just use more pressure), and start adding hook ups. try and connect a few letters. If you look at this example, you can see that i added pipes to connect letters (like the top of the "G" connecting to the "L"), arrows pointing in different directions (like the one on the top of the "W", chips like the one on the bottom corner of the "S". And be very creative in adding hookups, but don't over do it.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/d4a5e8d0.jpg

    4- now get a black outliner ( fine point marker), let the ink dry, then erase the pencil.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/d4c5e8d0.jpg

    5- Optional, you can add some shadow style 3D.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/d4d5e8d0.jpg


    How to Construct A Basic Letter

    1- Get a light pencil and pick a letter that you want to piece. now in constructing this letter we are gonna piece it together like building blocks. this is an example using the letter "B" and "S". Now pickin a starting point is purely up to the individual, i like to start with what i would consider a basic frame.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/ead5ec40.jpg

    2- Now as you can see i am overlapping lines, sort of like a transparent style letter, but these lines will be erased after we ink the out lines in later.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/eaf5ec40.jpg

    3- You can be alot more creative once you get used to this kind of letter building, but for now keep it simple.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/eb15ec40.jpg

    4- After your done you can ink in the outer lines of the letter and then erase all the pencil lines, and thats it.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/eb35ec40.jpg

    5- Also you can get more creative and add hookups and 3D to make the letter more funky.

    [Broken External Image]:http://www.mrwiggles.biz/eb45ec40.jpg


    How to Construct Block 3D- http://www.mrwiggles.biz/how_to_do_block_3d.htm
    How to Construct Basic Arrows- http://www.mrwiggles.biz/how_to_construct_arrows.htm
    Blackbook Supplies Page- http://www.mrwiggles.biz/id214.htm
     
  17. [breakout]-azer

    [breakout]-azer Senior Member

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    taken from http://www.godisart.com



    Introduction to Graffiti

    This article is to help set the course for beginners that are having problems understanding how progression and letter structure works. Hundreds of kids that are new to graff come to toy blackbook forums every month and post pictures of ridiculous wildstyles they can't grasp yet. They are then critiqued by someone who tells them to "go simpler", which inevitably they reply "what do you mean by simpler?". Instead of re explaining this 1 million times, we can simply point them to this article, which will demonstrate proper letter structure, progression, and the importance of simple letters as a starting point.

    Q=Why start with simple letters? I can do block letters!
    Answer= No. You probably can't. At least not well.

    Block letters provide an important foundation for those beginning. Why? It teaches you letter structure. Any good piecer should be able to rock a perfect block or simple letter. If you can't get the width, height, and flow down with that, how are you going to rock a wildstyle? Controlling what your pencil is doing is necessary if you want to get ill with letters, and nothing will teach you better than blocks and simples, even if you do find them boring, you still need to do them and you need to focus and do them well. Don't bust your name once and think you've got it down.


    Author: Inko

    Names
    There aren't too many rules for choosing a name except BE ORIGINAL! The dumbest thing i see people do is take some common word and spell it properly! WTF??! To top it off they then add 'One' to the end to signify that they are the first. These people need their heads kicked in. For one, if you are choosing a word that is relatively common, and spelt properly you can be sure that there are plenty more toys out there writing that exact same thing "PureOne" FORGET IT! And what's worse? Some legend from back in the day probably had that name and rocked it with styles 100 fold what you've got in your pocket. So respect your history, if someone else has been writing your name with more style then drop it. Here's my rules of thumb for choosing a name: 1. Make up a word. 2. Misspell your word (ex: "Fawn" can be written fon, fonn, fohn, phon, phawn, etc...) 3. Don't claim to be One, Unless you are established writer you can forget about being the first.
    And how could i forget lots of people get names passed on to them, but if that is you then you are likely passing over this bit.

    Letter Forms
    As has been said to you all time and time again Block Letters are your best friend when you begin writing. Block letters reinforce fundamental aspects of letter styles in your mind. Most people take their knowledge of letter forms for granted when they start writing, hence all those ridiculous "wild styles" which pwn us 4ll 3v3ryd4y. You've got to learn which aspects of a letter are required in order for it to be legible and proper. That's where block letters come in. Block letters ARE those fundamental pieces of letters which are needed in order for them to be legible. My advice is that you look at your keyboard, and just draw the letters over and over. over and over and over and over and over. I'm not talking like 5/6 times, i'm talking like 100/200 times. A huge thing to keep an eye on is letter proportion, make sure your vertical lines are all the same width, your horizontal lines all the same width, and your diagonal lines all the same width. Of course this rule does have lots of fluctuation once you get better, but for the time this is key, otherwise your letters will lose that legibility. And despite what you think about how insanely dope crazy illegible wildstyles are, you still need to be able to read your graffiti. Even those crazy illegible wildstyles are legible to the trained eye. Why? because they put emphasis on those bits of letters that make them legible.
    Anyway once you've mastered simple font like block letters start playing with aspects of it: Try leaning them all one direction. Try making some smaller and some bigger, keep it patterned, not random. Try bending them all in the middle. Try weighting them all higher or lower using middle pieces (like the middle of an E). Try forming them into a shape. Hopefully by this time you have got a decent handstyle developed, try making your pieces include some interesting components of your handstyle lettering, my handstyle has strongly influenced my piecing style.
    Stay the flip away from extensions. Extensions will come to you once you know you are a good enough writer. Eventually you will just begin to see where letters can have add-ons without compromising their shape.

    3D
    Not much can be said about 3d that hasn't already in this thread. There's a few different ways you can pop your letters out, 3d is one, drop shadow is another, a simple keyline/forcefield does it as well (although they compliment a 3d/drop shadowed piece even more). 3D can be done directionally, in any direction you please, or it can be done in perspectives. I don't really understand them fully, i just kind of do them. One thing i always keep in mind when doing my 3D is that i draw out my outline, stand back and say "Which way should it point?" It's all about direction because graffiti is all about flow/movement/directing the audiences eyes. So make the direction of your 3d compliment the flow/movement of your piece.

    Colors
    I find pretty much most people are subjective with their color choices. There are some good standards like black/white, silver/black, etc... But it all depends on what you want to do and what colors you feel like using. I find a good thing to remember is to do a light outline if I am using a dark fill, and vice versa. This way your letters don't get lost into your color. Of course there are ways around this, like using a dark fill & dark outline, but light inline. But you will learn those type of things as you progress. I usually like to contrast my 3d pretty hard color-wise with my fill, but that is just me, and just reinforces what i said about it being subjective, because some people probably think that looks ridiculous.
     
  18. SweetRevenge

    SweetRevenge Senior Member

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  19. Kayone707

    Kayone707 Moderator

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  20. MUSASHI

    MUSASHI Elite Member

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    View attachment 250503

    see what direction the bad one takes? I see more of this than I care to and from alot of advanced cats too,this is what happens when one becomes impatient,it's a sign of undisciplined behavior.

    the next one which is good is better than bad and you can get a cool effect sometimes by using this technique.

    the third one which is better you make your strokes the whole length of the section you are coloring being careful not to overlap the wet ink onto the dry ink if at all possible,this takes patients ,a steady hand and discipline.

    the fourth one which is the best requires using the principles of the third technique but going over the section at a 90 degree angle to achieve that deep rich color.


    I'll keep editing this as I think of different ways to color on paper and different mediums.
     
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